Thanksgiving Hours at New York Pass

By Go City Expert

Sonic the Hedgehog at the Thanksgiving Day Parade in 2013
Thanksgiving is almost here and while it's common for stores to be open and services to be available during holidays in New York City, there will be some closures and reduced hours. Our main office at 36 W 44th St. will be closed on November 24th and 25th. Our doors will open again on Monday, November 28th at 8am. To collect or purchase your New York Passes, or to ask questions or express concerns, please visit any of the Big Bus locations, which operate on weekends. On Thanksgiving Day, the Big Bus locations will be open during the following hours: Welcome Center: 8am to 6pm Madame Tussauds: 8am to 5pm Luggage Source: Closed Due to the Macy's Day Parade, there will be some changes on the bus routes as well: Uptown, Midtown and Downtown will begin at 11am (after parade) Brooklyn Tour will operate the same Night Tour will operate the same To see which attractions will be open on Thanksgiving Day, please see the list on our website or mobile app. The attractions that will be open are marked with a turkey icon. Holidays in New York City are magical, as the city shines with glittering lights and the streets exude a gleeful atmosphere. Unsurprisingly, Thanksgiving and Christmas time are some of the most popular times to visit. Please be prepared for increased crowds and longer lines at the popular attractions. Happy Thanksgiving from the New York Pass!
Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

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Five New York Museums You Mustn't Miss

New York has no shortage of museums, so how do you even know where to start? Below, we’ve done some of the work for you—we’ve picked the five New York museums you must not miss. (You still need to do the walking around yourself –but hey, that’s the fun part.) The Metropolitan Museum of Art Why visit the Met? The Met (not to be confused with the opera) is one of the world’s great museums for a reason—it has two million works of art and 17 curatorial departments; the works range from ancient times all the way up the present day. The building will wow you from the moment you see it from the Fifth Avenue—with its Beaux-Arts façade and sweeping Great Hall, you could easily spend quite a while just gaping at the entrance. But there’s so much more to see! How do you choose where to start? Start off with the not-to-be-missed galleries—take a right when you enter, and wander through the Egyptian Galleries, making sure to see the centerpiece--the Temple of Dendur, which was given as a gift to the United States. (The galleries are arranged chronologically, which makes it easier.) Check out some of the small, out-of-the-way study galleries too. When you leave those galleries, you’ll be right near the Arms and Armor Court. Start off in the center gallery, in which the cavalry armor is displayed, and don’t mis the non-western armor, like that worn by Samurai warriors. When you leave, be sure to visit the American Wing Courtyard with its glass widows facing Central Park. And highlights? Everyone wants to see the Impressionist works of art, so swing by the second floor--while you’re up here, check out the recently renovated musical instruments galleries. You won’t be able to see everything in one visit (or 20) so leave some time to simply wander. Maybe the vast Asian art galleries? The masks in the African galleries? Don’t forget the Treasury full of gold pieces in the Ancient Americas galleries, or the beautiful period rooms. If you need some peace and quiet, the Astor court with its calming koi pond is the place to go. [caption id="attachment_3001" align="alignnone" width="800"] Put The Metropolitan Museum on your list of the five New York museums you must not miss[/caption] Museum of Modern Art Wasn’t MoMa recently renovated? How do I explore it? Yes. With its expanded gallery spaces, completely reinstalled collections, and new spaces for live and experimental programs, it’s pretty much like a completely new museum. Drop into their new Creativity Lab to ask questions, participate in conversations, and even make some art. Check out the new store and dining options (an art lover’s gotta eat). And that’s a good question that doesn’t have a right answer. You probably won’t want to miss the section that showcases works of art from the 1880s-1940s (yes, Starry Night is there) and the one that will undoubtably prove to be among the most popular--the space that showcases works from the 1970s-1970s. Some permanent installations will be switched every six months (so they’re not really permanent.) Different kinds of art are now displayed in the same gallery, as are works of art from different periods of time; there’s more of sense of connection among different works. You’ll want to visit several times--and that’s kind of the point. [caption id="attachment_2978" align="alignnone" width="2000"] Installation view of Architecture Systems (gallery 417), The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2019 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Robert Gerhardt[/caption] The New Museum So, it must be asked. What’s new about the New Museum? The New Museum was founded in 1977, so it’s new-ish. When it was first founded, it was the first museum dedicated to contemporary art in New York since World War 2. The museum encompasses art forms ranging from sculpture to photography, from artists around the world. It’s the place to go to see cutting-edge works; it’s focused on new art and new ideas, and is also focused on under-represented and emerging artists. Think of as the anti-art-museum art museum. It’s also got a cool building that’s worth checking out in and of itself---it looks like a stack of rectilinear boxes that are somewhat off-center. Interestingly, it's a non-collecting museum, which keeps its focus on the new. It’s also the place to check out what’s happening globally and in the art world in general; make sure you have a lot of battery power, because no matter what’s happening there, it’s great for photos. The Frick Hasn’t the Frick been around like, forever? If by “forever,” you mean, “since the early 1930s,” then yes, it has. The museum is kind of like one of those grand dames you see having a pot of tea and some crumpets at an elegant but faded tearoom—a little incongruous, but somehow reassuring and necessary. Housed in an elegant mansion on Fifth Avenue, the building is home to the collection of Henry Clay Frick. It includes works by eminent European artists including Fragonard and Vermeer, as well as gorgous porcelain and furniture. Just strolling through the galleries is like stepping into another era, and because it’s small, you can cover pretty much everything in one visit. It’s also incredibly calming just to walk around. Fun Fact: The Frick is the model for the Avengers Mansion in the Marvel Comics. [caption id="attachment_3003" align="alignnone" width="6000"] The Frick, on Fifth Avenue, is one of our picks for the five New York museums you must not miss[/caption] The Brooklyn Museum [caption id="attachment_3008" align="alignnone" width="800"] Across the Brooklyn Bridge you’ll find the world-class Brooklyn Museum[/caption] Is it worth going to Brooklyn to visit the museum? Yes, absolutely. Did you know that the Brooklyn Museum has 1.5 million works of art? Or that it has one of the finest collections of Egyptian art in the world? Even if you didn’t (well, now you do) it’s worth a visit—or several. They also have a fine American art collection (Rothko, Hopper, Rockwell, and Homer, to name a few of the artists), as well as a Memorial Sculpture Garden, featuring salvaged architectural pieces from around the city. They’re also known for great special exhibits and public programs. Looking to up your cool factor after you've explored some museums? Check out the way hipsters inhabit Brooklyn
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The NYC Subway: Tips for Beginners

The New York City subway system is the largest of its kind in the entire world. With 472 operational stations, the underground trains provided nearly two billion rides in 2017 alone. So suffice it to say: the subways can get pretty complicated. Cabs are expensive and usually slower due to traffic, so whether you're a local or just visiting, you'll likely have to traipse down the concrete subway stairs at some point. But before you descend into the bowels of America's largest city, here are some tips for beginners. Finding your station. There are a total of 36 different subway lines shuttling passengers across Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, and the Bronx. As the name suggests, most subways operate below ground. However, there are a few lines which travel above. Nonetheless, odds are you will be going underground. The key is to look at the signs above each station, indicating which subway lines it services and the direction each train is headed. Note: subway lines are either numbers or letters. Usually, there are two entrances on either side of the same street. Each entrance puts you on a different track. It's important to know which direction you want to go and to enter that entrance accordingly, because not every station allows passengers to which sides of the tracks without incurring additional fees. If you do board a train headed in the opposite direction , don't freak out. Get off at the next stop, walk up to street level, cross the street, and switch routes. It happens to the best of us. How much does it cost? As of Fall 2019, one ride costs $2.75 USD. Every time you enter a subway station you have to swipe your ticket (MetroCard) to access the train tracks. You can purchase a ticket at the automated vendors or by talking with the teller at a booth. MetroCards hold either a finite amount of credit or you can buy an unlimited week/month pass. Every rider needs their own individual MetroCard. (Babies do not require a separate MetroCard.) If this is your first time visiting NYC, I suggest getting a 7-day unlimited MetroCard. It only costs $32 USD and allows you room to make directional errors without incurring additional costs. Plus you will find yourself using the subway several times a day, and at $2.75 per ride, that will add up to the cost of an unlimited MetroCard quickly. Cut your losses! Note: Unlimited MetroCards can only be swiped every 15 minutes. Don't think you can buy one and use it for your entire family. Good idea, but the Metropolitan Transit Authority already thought of that. Sorry! How do I know when to get off? Newer subways will have light-up graphics indicate which stop along the route you're on. However, older trains will not. Don't worry, the conductor will always announce which stop you're arriving at and which stop is next. If you don't understand them or miss the announcement, you can look out the window and see signs for which station the train has just pulled into. There will be several. Additionally, there are maps of the entire subway system in each train car. Does the subway stop running? The NYC subways and busses operate 24 hours. However, early in the AM, they do run less frequently. Is it safe? Yes. The New York City subway system is relatively safe. A good thing about "the city that never sleeps" is that, at almost any given time, there will be other passengers riding with you. Note: homeless men and women often sleep on the subways late at night. They usually shouldn't bother you, but if you see a train car that has just one person in it -- it's best to get onto another car. Are there bathrooms? There are no bathrooms on subway trains or in the station. Be sure you've gone before you embark on your journey. Are pets allowed? According to the MTA website, small pets are allowed, but must be in a bag or carrier. However, Service dogs are allowed to ride with passengers. How timely are the trains? Different subway lines run at different rates of frequency. Delays and reroutes are common, unfortunately. Add an extra twenty minutes to your travel time to account for any public transit mishaps. Additional rider tips: When you are about to enter a subway car, like an elevator, let the people who are already on the train get off before you enter. On station staircases, bear right. It's not uncommon to see subway performers, both on the platform and train itself. If you hear someone shout, "Showtime, showtime!" It's an indicator they're about to perform, and you should step to the side of the subway car. The trains move very fast, and while you think you don't have to hold onto a poll -- do it. Nothing is more frustrating to New Yorkers than a tourist who falls on top of them. Subway seating is limited, therefore be sure you're not spreading your legs and taking up more room than necessary. Don't place your bag beside you on a seat, put it between your legs on the floor. The local rule of thumb is, if you see an elderly person or pregnant woman, you offer them your seat. The trains get very crowded during rush hour. Backpacks take up a lot of standing room, so be sure to take them off and hold them between your legs. New Yorkers can be very brusk, if someone is rude to you or shouts, it's best to let it go. No need to ruin you and your fellow passengers' commute by getting into a fight. Wondering where you should take the subway to? Check out some must-see NYC sites here.
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New York at night
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The Best Things to do at Night in New York

The best things to do at night in New York by Mia Russell When the sun goes down, the Big Apple comes alive. Neon lights begin to flicker, restaurants buzz and theaters roll out their red carpets. From outdoor movies in pretty parks to bustling night markets and Broadway shows, when it comes to nightlife, New York has something for everyone! Let's check out what's on the cards when the sun sets in the 'City that Never Sleeps.' Soak up the city lights from an Observation Deck There is no better way to toast the sunset over New York than from one of the many observation decks dotted about the city. Watch the city lights begin to twinkle as twilight turns to night and see the city like never before. Several Manhattan buildings have observation decks open in the evening where you can take in the city for all its glory. Top of the Rock at the Rockefeller Center The Top of the Rock takes up the last three floors of Rockefeller Center. It features three levels of indoor and outdoor observation decks that offer spectacular, unobstructed views of the city skyline. The 68th and 69th floors have terraces with glass railings that provide beautiful panoramic views of the whole city. The 70th floor boasts an open-air rooftop deck with no metal or glass enclosures, providing perfect photo opportunities! Enjoy several unique experiences on the way up to the Top of the Rock ranging from the magnificent Joie chandelier and an exhibit of interactive artworks to a sound and light hallway and a time capsule over Manhattan. Use your pass to gain free admission to the Top of the Rock to soak up the incredible 360 ̊ panoramic views. Empire State Building Head up the world-renowned Empire State Building to the main deck observatory on the 86th floor to take in those famous New York City views. Use your pass to enjoy complimentary access to the Empire State Building and whizz up to the open-air observation deck that wraps around the building's spire. Marvel at the endless views, which on a clear evening, can stretch all way across six states! The Edge Cast your eyes over the city from one of the highest outdoor sky decks in the world. Located at 30 Hudson Yards, the Edge is a state-of-the-art platform with a glass floor that extends out into mid-air 100 floors above the ground. Feel like you are floating above the city as you sip a glass of bubbles from the Champagne bar to toast the sunset and take in unrivaled panoramic city views. This one is not for the faint-hearted! Remember to use your pass to gain free access to the Edge. One World Observatory Take in the sunset from the highest point in the city – the top of the One World Observatory. Zip up to the 102nd floor in just 47 seconds in the astonishingly fast SkyPodTM Elevators while you watch a multimedia display of New York City transforming from unsettled lands into a forest of skyscrapers. Look over the city below through the glass floor of the Sky Portal and enjoy several thrilling audiovisual experiences while you are at the top of the world. Use your pass to enjoy complimentary access to the One World Observatory, as well as an exclusive discount off a signature cocktail from One World Observatory's premier restaurant and bar, One Dine. Cheers! Hit Times Square Times Square is one of New York's top attractions and offers second to none nightlife! It's packed with a wealth of entertainment from bars, restaurants, and nightclubs to theaters and TV recording studios and really comes alive at night. Learn about the famous district on a Broadway & Times Square Walking Tour. Use your pass to enjoy this tour where an experienced actor and director tour guide will take you to all the hot spots. Have a laugh at the LoL Times Square Comedy Club or head to the Bowlmor Times Square arcade for bowling, state-of-the-art video games, and old-school pinball. Use your pass to visit Madame Tussauds and gain free access to the MARVEL Universe 4D cinema experience. Sip cocktails at the Haven Rooftop bar and watch the action on Time Square below. Catch a Broadway show A quintessential evening activity in New York is catching a Broadway show. While they are expensive, the experience is an unforgettable one and really shouldn't be missed! With over 40 official Broadway theaters in New York, you're bound to find something that piques your interest. Top tip: The best way to get discounted show tickets is to head to TDF's TKTS Booth in Duffy Square (47th Street and Broadway) and wait in line on the day of the show. You can get some fantastic discounts on tickets for most shows. Catch a different kind of show If you prefer something more energetic, use your pass to enjoy the Shake, Rattle & Roll Dueling Pianos Show Hosted at the historic Cutting Room on East 32nd Street, this three-hour rock 'n' roll extravaganza features an all-request evening of live music from dueling pianos, fantastic food, and plenty of drinks. If jazz is your thing, head to Harlem, the birthplace of the music genre, to enjoy a classic jazz performance. Use your pass to get tickets to the Harlem Jazz Series, a one-hour performance of classic jazz hits some of the industry's best musicians. Enjoy a sunset movie at Bryant Park If the weather is good, why not watch an outdoor movie at Bryant Park? Tucked behind the New York Public Library, Bryant Park is the beating cultural heart of Midtown Manhattan and is famous for its iconic movie nights under the stars. Grab a delicious picnic pack from Perfect Picnic with your pass and find a spot on the lawn for a romantic evening out. Top tip: These movie nights are extremely popular, so get there when the lawns open at 5 pm to get a good spot. Take in the city lights from the ferry Soak up the magical after-dark glow of the Big Apple on a romantic harbor cruise. Use your pass to hop on a Harbor Lights Cruise with Circle Line and enjoy a cruise through the city. There is indoor and outdoor seating, a full bar on board, and an outdoor viewing deck for those Insta-worthy photographs. The narrated cruise offers interesting facts about famous New York landmarks like the Brooklyn Bridge and the Statue of Liberty as you glide past. Catch a Yankees game One of the most exciting things to do in New York at night is to watch a Yankees game under the lights. Head to the game a little earlier and use your pass to enjoy a Classic Tour of the Yankee Stadium Get a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at the legendary stadium as you visit areas not usually open to the public, like the dugout and the press box. Watch out for the ghost of Babe Ruth, who apparently wanders around the stadium! Stargaze at the High Line As the sun begins to set , head to the unique High Line Park to take in some spectacular city views. The once-disused railroad track was converted into a verdant floating garden and now passes through some of New York City's most historic neighborhoods. Wander along the elevated park on a High Line, Chelsea & Meatpacking District Walking Tour with your pass. Take in the art installations and admire some of New York's most famous buildings, including the Empire State Building and Frank Gehry's IAC Building. You can also enjoy free stargazing evenings at the High Line every Tuesday from dusk until 9:45 pm. Telescopes are provided and spaced throughout the park by the Amateur Astronomers Association, who are also on hand to help and answer any questions.
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