Hanukkah in New York

By Go City Expert

Looking for ways to celebrate Hanukkah in New York? (Or Chanukah. Both are fine.) We’ve got your list, with everything from family days to a Hanukkah Christmas party that will go into the wee hours.

Hanukkah Family Day-The Jewish Museum

Looking for a fun family activity to celebrate Hanukkah? Check out the Jewish Museum’s Family Day. Participants will make a Hanukkah lamp with found objects, visit the galleries, and watch a performance. Families will also participate in other projects, including a group one, which takes place throughout the day. December 15. [caption id="attachment_3450" align="alignnone" width="413"]

Photo Courtesy of the Jewish Museum[/caption]

Large Menorah Lighting

While the world’s largest menorah is in Manhattan, a close runner-up can be found in Brooklyn. It’s been a Hanukkah fixture since 1985, and during Chanukah, thousands of people come out to see it being lit. Revelers will be greeted with live music and latkes, and gifts are given to every child. Note: The rabbi who lights the menorah is assisted by a 60-foot boom lift, something worth seeing in and of itself.

Chanukah on Ice

You might have celebrated Chanukah at Grandma’s or a neighbor’s...but have you ever celebrated it on the ice? Well, you can do just that at Lasker Rink, in the north corner of Central Park. A DJ will play music throughout the evening, and special guest appearances are promised. Guests will also be treated to delicacies like latkes and donuts. And—ta da!—there will also be a giant hand-carved ice menorah. (It will be lit during the festivities, which take place December 22. Now that’s Hanukkah in New York!) And if you’re hankering for more ice skating, check out our tips here!

Menorahs and Manhattans

Want to imbibe some Manhattans while crafting a menorah? Of course you do. Head to the 92nd Street Y and you can do both. (The program is part of the Bronfman Center for Jewish life; check out their other programs as well.) December 14.

Xmas-Hanukkah @ Slate

If you’re looking for more of a party atmosphere, there's the Xmas-Hanukkah @ Slate event. Billed as an event for young professionals, it’s got a DJ, dance floors, and music ranging from hip hop to Israeli and Top 40. Dec. 24 (although technically it goes til 4 AM the next day.)

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Empire State Building: Anniversary

[caption id="attachment_1278" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Empire State Building | Photo by @javan[/caption] Empire State Building Around the world you’ll find monuments that perfectly embody the cities that they belong to. In Paris you have the Eiffel Tower and in Toronto you have the CN Tower that are globally recognized as buildings from these cities. The same is the case when you think of New York, as the Empire State Building automatically comes to mind. Along with structures like the Statue of Liberty and the Chrysler Building, the ESB is a solidified symbol of the “Empire State”. Anniversary On May 1st in 1931, the Empire State Building was dedicated and it began its long historic legacy. At one point in time it was the tallest building in the world and held that title for 40 years until the completion of the original World Trade Center in 1970. While being constructed, the gorgeous skyscraper designed by William F. Lamb was actually in a race with 40 Wall Street and the Chrysler Building to become just that. Despite not holding the title anymore, it’s still a staple in the image of the state and is often used as a voice in political and social climate. The iconic lighting atop the ESB was first used after just one year of the building’s completion. Since 1976 those lights have changed colors adding a beautiful element to New York’s skyline. We’ve seen the Empire State Building change the color of its lights to celebrate specific holidays throughout the year and also to represent solitude for different areas of the world if they ever experience hardship. The skyscraper makes for beautiful photos whether you’re standing on the other side of the city or on the inside of the building. Observation Deck One of New York’s treasured observation decks belongs to the Empire State Building. Along with Top of The Rock, the ESB observation deck is one of the most popular elevated areas for people in the city to take pictures and appreciate the skyline. This is a great place to catch views of the entire city from way above the ground. Another great thing about the ESB is that it’s open late, so you can also take night time photos of NYC until they close at 2 am. This is something to keep in mind if you’re building your itinerary. Thinking of visiting the Empire State Building? Entrance to the ESB is free with the New York Pass and allows you to enter within the operating hours: Monday-Sunday: 8am - 2am
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New York City in 72 Hours

This post originally appeared in Chaus Adventure a blog by a couple from London, travelling the world. View from Top of the Rock New York is one of the most popular cities in the US and it is easy to see why. Known as the City that Never Sleeps, is it possible do to New York in a weekend? The answer is yes and we will show you how! We spent a total of 96 hours in New York, of which 24 hours was spent at a wedding and with friends. So in reality, we only had 72 hours to explore! We travelled with the New York Pass and this is one of the main reasons why we were able to do so much in so little time! The New York Pass has over 90 attractions to choose from and it allows you to fast track some of the busiest attractions. Passport covers by Always Rooney What I loved most about the pass is their free app. This app allows you to plan your trip in advance, setting your own budgets and has all the details you need about each attractions. We planned our itinerary on the app before we travelled. The New York Pass cost: 1 Day Pass- $109 2 Day Pass- $189 3 Day Pass- $199 5 Day Pass- $249 7 Day Pass- $279 Overview of our itinerary and cost without the New York Pass Day 1 (10 hours) Grand Central Terminal New York Public Library Flatiron Building Madison Square Park The High Line Day 2 (full day) Big Bus Tour ($60) New York Water Taxi Tour ($31) Brooklyn Bridge cycle ($45) Brooklyn 9-11 Memorial Oculus Shopping Mall Empire State Building ($32) Day 3 (full day) MOMA ($25) Central Park cycle ($49) NY Natural History Museum ($22) Top of the Rock ($32) The Ride ($74) Day 4 (14 hours) Madame Tussauds ($37) 9-11 Museum ($24) Top of the Rock We were able to squeeze most of New York City into 72 hours as you can see! We absolutely loved the New York Pass. Without the New York Pass, we would have had to spend $433 per person on attractions alone on this trip...!! Even if you consider the cost of the pass ($199- 3 day pass) we saved a massive $234 each, $468 in total! We have reviewed many city passes before and hands down, the New York Pass is the best one so far. The card itself resembles a chip and pin card and all you have to do is hand this card over at each ticket counter and you can get your tickets for free. A lot of other city passes do not give you free access to the most popular attractions or they only offer tickets at a reduced price. The New York Pass included everything we wanted to see in New York (and more) and when they say FREE, they mean free! Some of the queues (or ‘lines’ as they say in America) were horrendously long... We were so glad have fast track tickets because it literally saved us hours of waiting. If you are planning to visit New York, seriously consider this pass. Unless you have no interest in saving money or time... Stay tuned for more on our trip to NYC. On our next post, we will show you more photos and tell you more about each attraction we visited! You can get yourself a New York Pass HERE, there is a sale on right now!
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